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‘To hear fully the subtlety in Furry’s singing is to gain an insight not only into the singer, but into the creative process of the blues itself,’ wrote Sam Charters. Vocalions and Victors by the Memphis legend.

Bawdy, vaudevillian malarkey, both country and urban, with no messing musically. Stuff like Banana Man, You Put It In I’ll Take It Out, I Had To Give Up Gym, Elevator Papa Switchboard Mama. Crumb cover.

The greatest gospel bluesman; one of the very greatest bottle-neck guitarists. Almost overwhelmingly intense and gripping.

1928-35 recordings by the Memphis bluesman (with Cherokee Indian in his lineage) — including That’s No Way To Get Along, later covered by the Rolling Stones as Prodigal Son.

Thoroughly entertaining downhome blues, intricate ragtime, hokum and instrumental guitar stomps.

Bumptious sauce recorded for Paramount in 1929 by different lineups including Leroy Carr, Scrapper Blackwell, Tampa Red and Blind Blake, and Bob Robinson on banjo and clarinet. Archetypal Crumb; 180g.

‘You could scarcely find two more contrasting bottleneck stylists… the ‘Hawaiian Guitar Wizard’ played upbeat, concerned with smooth tone. Arnold usually played solo, with strident tones, generally frenetic…’

Stokes, Memphis Minnie, Furry Lewis, Gus Cannon and co. 180g, well-pressed.

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