Honest Jons logo

His fourth album, already. Banjo and guitar, including a first full outing on lap guitar. Mostly solo, but fiddler Sally Morgan from the Black Twig Pickers is here, and Charlie Devine pops up on banjo.

Forty-seven previously tracks by the likes of Dave Van Ronk, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Kate McGarrigle and Sleepy John Estes, recorded in performance from 1967 to date at this tiny location in upstate NY.

From 1920s and 1930s 78s by luminaries like Amede Ardoin, Dennis McGee, Joe And Cleoma Falcon — some of the rarest, most compelling, most heart-breaking of all South-West Louisianian music.

Classic banjo-fiddle-guitar-vocals combos, plus instrumentals featuring twin-fiddle and piano. All the Highlanders gear with Roy Harvey, Lucy Terry, and twin-fiddlers Lonnie Austin and Odell Smith.

His only solo album, from 1968, when he was on the Greenwich Village circuit, plaiting together blues and Eastern styles in the same neck of the woods as Fahey, Basho et al, but in his own way.

Legendary, no-nonsense, masterful finger-picking, with ethereal harmonics reminiscent of Washington Phillips. Reissuing a private-press LP recorded in Arkansas in the early 1960s. Notes by John Renbourn.

Country and hillbilly 78s: songs about work, hardship and loss; dance tunes, comic numbers, and novelties; hymns and sacred pieces.
Pay hard, too.

Well worth checking the ‘psychedelic appalachia’ of this twenty-two-year-old guitarist from Fredericksberg (like the late Jack Rose).

Pentecostal vocal delirium and fine, secular, Texan pianism, recorded by OKeh in 1926. Michael Corcoran tells AD’s story.

The first in forty-seven years from this veteran American Primitive. Witty, stark, smouldering guitarism, as ever.

Another searingly soulful hundredweight — visceral and soaring by turns —  from the team behind Fire In My Bones, this is just as unmissable. Very warmly recommended.

The joys and sorrows, and virtuoso musicianship, of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim immigrants from the dissolving Ottoman Empire, recorded in NYC — plus a disc of masterpieces from their homeland. Warmly recommended.

At the wild, searing fountainhead of Zydeco: the black accordionist and singer with white fiddler Dennis McGee, on Afro-Creole scorchers, waltzes, blues and breakdowns. Cajun’s Robert Johnson.

Twenty-six recently recorded solo guitar versions of tunes spanning his entire career.

Focusing on the here and now this time, with spots for C Joynes, Micah Blue Smaldone, Tyler Ramsey (Band of Horses), William Tyler (Silver Jews) and company.

Country blues and folk originating from the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, and the First World War — humorous and tragic, sardonic and vivid, with some terrific fiddlin’ and pickin’.

Vital and thrilling, raw and original compilation by Mike McGonigal (who’s done stuff for Mississippi), spanning all styles — solo and congregational, studio and field, rural and urban, hellfire and lament.

Lovely, ruminative, lyrical piano playing from this master — with snatches from some of your favourite songs weaving in and out, as Blake pays tribute to greats like Billie Holiday, Hank Williams, Nat King Cole.

Originally released as a short-run private press LP in 1965, this is an American Primitive guitar classic.

The folk-raga maestro back with gorgeous Spanish-inspired music alert to the origins of flamenco in ancient East Indian styles.

Essential early work from guitarist James Blackshaw, making its debut as a proper CD.

12