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The most comprehensive collection of steel guitar pop instrumental music from India: film hits from 1962-1986; and all the masters of the steel guitar sound from the period are represented. Vinyl at last.

Cicadas, dragonflies and other insects boogie down live and direct from Laos, Thailand and Burma.

Ngoni blues, street clamour with radios and soundsystems on the move, the stunning voice of Jalimusa Amanita Diabate, Fulani flutes, Dogon chants and Mande songs.

Another unmissable Mark Gergis compilation of Iraqi folk and pop, from the Saddam era. Fiddles, double-reed instruments, bass, keyboards, and oud over a driving beat topped with rat-tat-tat-tat percussion…

Featuring vintage sides by Po Sein (one of the giants of early Burmese music and theatre), vocal and harp music from 1929, ‘modern songs with electric guitar’, and unique Burmese pop songs with piano.

Shot between 2007 and 2012, Hisham Mayet’s film is an exhilarating, hallucinatory, harrowing record of music, ritual, life, and landscape along the Niger River, as it winds through Mali and the Republic of Niger.

Tucker Martine’s informal 1994 recordings of musicians passing through the home of gnawa master Maallem Boubker Ghania — interwoven with street encounters (snake charmers, weddings) and dial surfing.

Traditional Islamic folk music from China, with Arabic, Persian, and Turkish influences: Kazakh, Uyghur, Kirgiz and Mongol Erut musicians on stringed instruments like topchar, komuz, rushtar, rawab, tchang.

Infectious songs and rootical instrumentals — the fifth SF album presenting Laurent ‘Kink Gong’ Jeanneau’s amazing documentation of the vanishing indigenous music of the rural Asian frontiers.

Limited, gatefold LP version of the first SF CD release in 2003: droning beat pop, early Orkes Melayu songs, Batak Tapanuli, traditional Minang, and rare folk drama from the Indonesian island, from cassettes.

A cosmic take on Saharoui roots: traditional Moorish instruments like the three-string tinidit lute, ardin harp, clay tbal drum, and tea glasses, together with guitar and Korg synth, and Halima’s exalted singing.

Electric guitar and tinidit, with keyboards, two female voices and drums — raw, distorted, thrilling, like an unhinged Hendrix automatic-drawing Mauritanian and Sahrawi roots.

‘Compiled from Group Doueh’s personal archives, these five tracks (note sidelong piece on the flip), are as brain shifting in their ecstatic brilliance as any music ever heard.’

Searing, electrifying blues-rock-Saharan-trance, recorded in Dakhla, West Sahara in 2010, this is great.

‘amplified roots rock, blues, and folk in the local Tuareg styles entering into full-on electric guitar psychedelia… two electric guitars, a drum kit and a chorus of vocalists’ (SF). ‘Buy it!’ (Honest Jon’s).

‘Saharan trance stun guitar… a hypnotic choogle that rivals both the Magic Band’s early 70s marathon workouts and the Velvet Underground’s drone on tracks like Sister Ray.’

Sahrawi music, haunting and hypnotic — from poetry sung over traditional instruments to electrifying grooves drenched in reverb and phase effects. Doueh, tidinit, field recordings from Nouakchott market…

New recordings invoking the grand traditions of Turkish psych with passionate recastings of tripped-out surf, Cambodian rock, Saharan guitar, electric Thai; even a little Sun City Girls post-punk.

A shocking-rocking Mulatu version, and some improv. Limited, to go with the tour.

From 1998-2000: street scenes, a wedding, a mosque, spontaneous music, political opinion, interviews (a gay man), radio stuff, a song about Saddam Hussein, the mystery of Kazib, underground city.

Beat rockers, psych pop, ballads and freak-outs from Indonesia’s answer to The Beatles.

Three scorchers recorded at Toumast — the Tuareg headquarters in Bamako — and a fourth in Ouagadougou, after the group flew Mali for Burkina Faso.

An invigorating jumble of country soul and asides from Laos and Thailand, drawn from 70s and 80s LPs, 45s and cassettes, mixing electric guitars and organs with traditional instruments like the khaen and the phin.

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