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Hindu and Buddhist ceremonies recorded on the wing, in the thick of the action — slowly rising vocal drones,  a big-bellied oboe, double-headed drums, chanting Bhikku monks, phallic cults.

Traditional Swedish polska by all sizes of violin-led ensembles of instruments like the nyckelharpa, cittra, harmonica, flute and guitar — in triol and sextondel, triplets and semiquavers.

Switzerland has four official languages and numerous dialects, and this mosaic of sounds is judiciously wide-ranging and open — starring wonderful yodelling, alphorn, Jew’s harp, zither and musette-style accordion.

A master of the sato (a bowed tambur or long-necked lute held vertically) joined by Tajik singer Ozoda Ashurova in this beautiful, haunting, little-known court music. Plus doyra drum and dotar lute.

Central Asian art music — derived from the Shash maqam of Bukhara — performed by the singer Jurabeg Nabiev, with the Ensemble Dorrdane.

Chimelougali is yodelling; luchenze is hooting whilst darting the tongue from side to side; kuama are trembling sounds, and rhythmic interjections. Including polyphonies, and a few with instruments.

Highly rhythmic ensembles of percussion, flutes, whistles and trumpets from the mountainous north of the country; and brilliant pichanchalassi playing, five flat stones struck with two oval stones.

Marvellous late recordings by this champion of Greek popular song, inimitably spinning it together with more acceptable forms like the candada, and Arabic, Andalusian and Gypsy influences. Killer buzuki taxims.

The ancient, shamanist, animist culture of the oriental Turks musically expressed in kuu by the komuz, a long-necked lute with a pear-shaped sound-box, and kui by the two-stringed dombra, about a metre long.

Utterly beautiful contemporary recordings.

A liturgy and feast headquartered in the mountains of Antalya, with semah sacred dancing and sung poetry accompanied on the saz lute. Six instrumentalists, two vocal lineups here: from 2004 and 2011.

Ceremonial music from villages in south-west Turkey, featuring a range of saz lutes, violin, and sipsi (a small oboe).

The Sulayiti Kalungi Ensemble Of Kampala presenting dances, religious invocations and profane songs, to a barrage of percussion and fervent choral singing.

Shashmaqom trio improvisation from Uzbekistan, artful and serious: heartfelt singing and fine tanbur lute playing, set off by the accompaniment of dutor and rabob lutes, and doyra percussion.

Deeply moving singing from Ferghana in Central Asia — classical, slow, suspenseful and meditative in a world of pain — accompanied by lutes, chang (a psaltery), nay flute, dayera tambourine, and ghijak spike fiddle.

From the Central Coast, afro music for rites and festivals, sharing with salsa drums like the cumaco (using the heel of the hand to vary pitch) and redondo, besides cow horns, car wheels, plates, sea shells.

The joropo, pasaje and tonada (with roots in sixteenth-century Spain) played on the bandola, a pear-shaped, four-stringed guitar, made from cedar — with maracas and cuatro accompaniment.

Refined, improvisatory, endangered traditional music for a quartet of two-stringed spike-fiddle, zither, two lutes.

Classical themes of courtly love, nostalgia, absence, from sublime fourteenth-century texts, done the old-fashioned way, with fine qanbus (Yemenite, not Oriental lute), and copper plate percussion.

Warm, nostalgic, stirring settings for voice, guitar, accordion and violin. Knowing nothing, we can hear Jacques Brel and Jake Thackray.

Judith Juma’s wonderful mbira playing — shona ritual music, with singing, drum and rattle.

Three singers a cappella, or with rattle and djembe, emulate the beautiful sound of the insingizi rain bird. Traditional, gospel, warrior-chant and political songs.

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