Honest Jons logo

Hurt, disillusioned, beautiful, pure, sensuous Windy City soul music from the mid-1970s, never out before — jazzy but street (like Donny Hathaway), musically sophisticated but emotionally straight (like Curtis). 

French-Belgian electro-samba, cornered. A mini-LP on the Brussels label, Les Disques Du Crepuscule, from 1982; augmented here by the first Antena EP, a few B-sides, compilation tracks, and two unreleased cuts.

Best of the in-house Soul Kitchen, Luau, and Bounty labels: a treasure trove of kitchen-sink eccentric soul, fuzzbox funk, shoestring doo-wop, and haunted, eerily hook-laden spirituals. Out-of-this-world packaging.

Great mid-seventies Chicago soul, the real deal. (The film never materialised.)

Invoking The Delfonics’ Do You Remember, and flipping its melody the other way around. Recorded at the Damon Studios in Kansas City (owned by Victor Damon, inventor of the spring reverb).

Calypso, blues, disco, funk, reggae, bruckdown, soul, folk — in the kitchen, Belizians would call it Boil Up. For the New York Post, ‘indispensable’; the Chicago Tribune’s ‘best reissue of the year’ (2006).

Seventies Caribbean soul and funk — one ear tuned in to nearby Miami, with reggae and jazz in the mix too — from Frank Penn’s Freeport operation.

Smoking mid-seventies Latin from Carlos Ruiz’ Ebirac label, headquartered back then in a bustling Puerto Rican community centre on the west side of the city.

Almost preposterous, this beautiful snapshot of a US expat community fetched up in Dimona, Israel, in the second half of the seventies, holding faith with its love of Chicago soul and spiritual jazz.

Blue-eyed, West Coast soul, with the MGs’ Steve Cropper marshalling an unlikely cast, from Don Henley to the Tower Of Power horns. With the two-step favourites Get It Up For Love and To Prove My Love.

A fascinating delve into the bizarre and brilliant world of Jeremiah Yisrael and the funky disco treasures of Tap Records. The boxed vinyl is beautifully done even by Numero standards, with 11 extras and a free CD.

A mega-mix of more than fifty artists featured in the Eccentric Soul series.

Reviewing Ellis Taylor’s Kansas City imprint — from prime Marva Whitney all the way through to Sharon Revoal’s ace, slinky, early-eighties disco-funk.

The history of the Chicago label, and the life of its owner Arrow Brown: twenty tracks of blistering R and B, sweet soul, and discofied funk. Now on vinyl, in a sumptuous Numero box-set.

For twenty years in Detroit, this label failed at everything except what counts: soulful doo-wop, blistering garage funk, sultry R and B, cut-rate Hendrix over a steel drum break.

Short for ‘Capital City Soul’, this Columbus, Ohio label ran for five years during the 1970s. Founded by Bill Moss, a local singer and DJ, Capsoul released just a dozen 45s and one LP.

Four years of singles on the Lloyd and Deep City labels run by Willie Clark and Johnny Pearsall: sixties Miami’s rarest of the rare, including the vinyl debuts of Betty Wright and Paul Kelly.

Quality sweet soul, ballads, thumping dancers, girl-group and the rest from Abe Epstein’s San Antonio label, late-1960s. Curtis and co in the air. Fine singing, big drums, strong horns, sophisticated arranging.

Out of Phoenix, Arizona, Lenaburg’s 60s and 70s productions typify the wrong-side-of-the-desert sound (if ever there was). A melange of Tejano psych, flutey funk, horny soul, and fistfight doo-wop.

Some gorgeous, classic, unmistakably Chicagoan soul here — the productions of Richard Pegue.

1234