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Sides from the 1940s and 50s, traditional songs and originals about Chicago and New York, the subway, racism and Pepsi, Africa and Trinidad. Factory-sealed cut-out, with an incision in the case.

Self-taught from age seven in country-rag-time on her bro’s banjo (whilst he was out), the opener here was her first accomplishment. From fifty years later, this entire record is pure magic and downright essential.

‘Experimental-spiritualistic environments’ — sax, keys, perc, viola, recorder, guitar, mbira, under the influence of out-there multi-media, Noh and Balinese Theatre… and you know what. Glorious 1973 hippie shit.

Spiritual free jazz and post-bop from 1976 — debut as leader for this veteran of sessions with John Coltrane, Curtis Mayfield, Rashied Ali and co.

Songs and ceremonies of the Yoruba, Dahomean, and Kongo-Angolan religions, performed by Marcus Portillo Dominguez, Candido Martinez and others, recorded in Cuba in the late 1950s by Lydia Cabrera.

‘Like soul on soul’, said Duke.

Mary Elfrieda Scruggs is from the Big Band tradition, and quite pedagogical about it, but you can hear Trane in Black Christ Of The Andes, and Tyner in this 1974 trio date.

‘A certain sense of untamed control, which makes him one of the best’ (Bob Dylan).
Classic hard-core Kentucky music, from three sessions — in 1961, 1964 and 1974.

A landmark field recording, exquisitely done, ambient and intimate, with beautiful music, and documentation by Colin Turnbull. A hit with Peter Brook, anyway.

Live radio and concert recordings plus the best of Broonzy’s 1950s Folkways recordings, including his classic Key To The Highway.

The squeeze-bulb honk horns of the truck and bus drivers union, belting it out with bells, drums, and voices, on the fiftieth anniversary of Ghana’s independence. Terrific stuff.

His earliest recordings, for Emory Cook — unflinching social commentary, spun with invincible exuberance and literary panache.

Dangdut is a raucous Javanese mix of Indian film music, transatlantic rock, scraps of Middle-Eastern pop. Kroncong songs with ukelele-style accompaniment (and brass band settings here) run way back to Portugal.

Gorgeous currulao from the Pacific coast of Colombia.

Watson family standards, including eleven previously unreleased performances. A Folkways classic. ‘This is gorgeous music, one of the best collections of old time music ever captured’ (Victory Review).

Early home recordings (from 1953), with the missus and another preacher.

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