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Unearthly musical saw and fine Hawaiian guitar soli recorded in the early 1920s.

Blind travelling musician with a voice as intensely haunted and elemental as Charley Patton — not standard Okinawa fare at all — accompanying himself on sanshin (southern shamisen) and tategoto (upright koto).

Anthony Maher’s 1988 dub album, an Australian commingling of JA science and UK post-punk and Industrial.

Improvisatory solo piano from 1965 — a trans-Mediterranean crossover based on traditional Algerian vocal pieces, with roots in Spanish Islamic culture. Hotly recommended.

Two great Folkways LPs from 1980 and ‘82. Minimal electronics — think Alvin Lucier, Alvin Curran, David Tudor — spiritual and exotic both, intercut with gentle guitar pieces. Altogether unique and lovely.

Great, great rewind from Afro-Caribbean London, 1979. The 20th Century Steel Band compounds intricate Afro-Trini rhythms with reggae and dub, funk, disco and soul, not to mention the eco-operatics.

One electric guitar, one sort-of-bass, preamps, amplifiers, microphones, one big room overlooking Osaka in 2005.

Japanese bedsit guitar blues including three Fahey covers, a Skip James and a William Moore. Heartfelt, forward-looking revivalism.

Acid rock and surf, 1969 soundtrack of another Paul Witzig film from down under.

The 1984 Vanguard LP Songs Of Electronic Despair, with bonus tracks. Bizarre MIDI/Synclavier genre-hopping, with femme robot disco vox, social satire, and touches of Laurie Anderson and Ann Magnusson.

A hep, hopped-up mix of Thai instruments with keyboards, drums and electric guitars; an addictive 60s blend of homegrown melodies and rock (notably The Shadows), surf, go-go, Latin, blues.

From the Tamam Shud milieu, the soundtrack for a 1982 Australian surf movie.

Virtuosic, sor-led molam music from Isan, the province bordering with Laos and Cambodia — sprightly melodies through haunting dirges, over woozy basslines, drones, clattering percussion.

Live recordings of his homemade guitar, a piece of wood with two magnetic pickups, a couple of bass strings, an unwound guitar string — texture and implied pulse rather than tonality and metrical rhythm.

Shell-shocked LA kids playing music on junk and scrap-metal instruments, from 1971, blasting a blazing mardi-gras Chris Kenner way up into West Hollywood. Nik Nak Paddy Whack on the flip. Great.

Deranged funk from Washington DC, overdosed on Funkadelic, Hendrix and New York No Wave.

A classic 1988 outing. A great party mash-up of ska, acoustic punk, accordions and banjos, with Cole Porter, Sex Pistols and Lee Perry in the mix.

A private pressing in 1978 — the first recordings of this entrancing, sun-dappled music, for 6 and 12-string guitars, and Eaton’s own, handmade, utterly beautiful string instruments.

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