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A kaleidoscopic 90 selections sprawling over six decades, with a 272-page book of essays and notes richly illustrated with more than 250 vintage photographs, record labels and sleeves. Another ravishing DTD release.

Six double-shots of rough, rollicking, hypnotic Berber music from the 1960s, the Golden Age of the Moroccan record industry. With a handsome full-colour insert including notes by the Luk Thung compiler.

Terrific collection of spiritual and gospel songs performed in informal non-church settings between 1965-1973 — mostly guitar-accompanied and performed by active or former blues artists.

The 1981 LP back on vinyl, with 24-page booklet; also as CDs (including 28 new tracks) in a 224-page hardback book combining the original liner notes with new essays, annotations and sixty-odd pictures, mostly new.

Sumptuously presented, fastidious sound-conversions of everything from medieval music manuscripts to historic telegrams, seventeenth-century barrel organ programmes to eighteenth-century ‘notations’ of Shakespearean recitation.

Dylan gave it to an enthused Neil Young: ‘the original wealth of our recorded music, the cream of the crop… it’s incredible. It’s in a wooden box and everything, and it’s just so beautiful.’

Recent church recordings: distorted PAs, female lead singers, claps, tambourines, ramshackle guitars move the earth to get congregations on their feet. Crossing Opika Pende and Johnny L. Jones, says the label.

Fabulous collection of early photographs from various sources, in numerous styles, to do with music, records, listening — and two CDs full of magical 78s, including several one-off amateur recordings.

One disc celebrating maternal kindness, discipline, teaching and love; another of songs about a mother’s death. 40 recordings, 65 antique photos in a hardback book: another exquisite Dust To Digital.

The flaming Appalachian gospel you can hear in Little Richard, James Brown, Elvis, especially Jerry Lee. Songs and sermons, 300-plus pages of riveting oral history, lyrics, 290 photos. Total Dust To Digital class.

A sample of fifty years’ ministry: two dozen soul stirrers, with sermonettes, guest soloists and righteous radio clips. ‘A hurricane starts off slowly… when she gets a certain speed, that’s when she’s dangerous.’

An intimate, profound documentary about buckdancing legend Thomas Maupin. Here’s a little ole trailer: http://vimeo.com/6434834.

A gorgeous hard-cover book — with 75 sepia photograph reproductions, an essay by Luc Sante — with a disc of rare gospel and folk, Washington Phillips to the Belmont Silvertone Jubilee Singers, and some preaching.

‘... a favourite item of anyone with an interest in genuine American traditional music’, wrote Shirley Collins about Volume I. Again a must, in a 10-inch box, with a 96-page book of essays, lyrics, photos and art.

144 colour pages of de luxe, clothbound porno for record nuts, and two fabulous discs of 1920s-50s Burmese guitars, Persian folk, fado, hillbilly and co, from Sublime Frequencies co-conspirators. Back in.

24 prime cuts from the fabulous Art Rosenbaum box set.

24 scorchers from Bali, Burma, Cameroon, China, England, Germany, Greece, India, Japan, Java, Laos, Poland, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Vietnam, and Yugoslavia.

A great audio companion to the Joe Bussard DVD. Stunning 78s — Charley Patton, Blind Willie Johnson, Son House, The Carter Family and the rest — all from his own collection.

Mass, full-voice singing from the rural South of the US. A stirring, tearful, ancient, strange, white kind of Gospel (not the same though). Ornette — ‘breath music. They’re changing the sound with their emotions.’

A gem of a box to the acclaimed standards of this Atlanta label: a lovely book with essays, historical articles and full track notes by the great US discographer Dick Spottswood, and hours of romping stomping jazz.