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Deep, tough Wackies killer with giddily nostalgic lyrics about setting out at midnight to a packed New York blues party. Massive vibes; murderous dub.

Irresistibly body-rocking, early-nineties digi — with vivid spaghetti detailing, as the unflappable Sixy keeps it holstered, and coolly rides west on a murderous b-line, rearin’ and careerin’ into the sunset.

Biff! That sublime, inimitable falsetto atop a stupendous digital-Tubbys one-away. Self-produced by Junior in 1987 for Ruddock’s Taurus imprint (though original copies are near-mythical).

Top-notch nineties vocal-group digital roots, out originally on Leggo.

Beautiful, close-harmony warning-tune — loose, mystical and heavy. The Radics at Channel One with Scientist at the desk.

The Heptone on a rocking melodica version of Conquering Lion.

A heavyweight, bumptious Tempo excursion from these Jammys associates, with a haunting message, implacable drums and bass, and sick synths which unravel meltingly in the dub. Super-rare and killer.

The grizzly-monster original 1984 cut (not the Power House do-over), plus shoot-out dub; with a Steve Knight excursion on the flip.

George Nicholson was a mainstay of Channel One at its height in the mid-80s, running his own Tasha imprint on the side. First of three excursions on the Strokes rhythm.

Tremendous though unreleased mid-tempo killers — yearning and moody, with the golden Radics touch; both songs with dubs.

Tremendous, transformative interpretation of the Bassies at Studio One — mournful, trenchant, rocking, heavy, dubwise, bad.

Killer Channel One — drums and bass, horns and organ stripped right back, just perfect, with ace singing, spare arrangement, chilled production. Posse Form A Line and Joker Lover excursions. Dubs, too. Lovely stuff.

Great, heavyweight Channel One gone to ground upon its original NY release; backed with a nice Revolution excursion. Both with dubs.

Great early-eighties Channel 1 excursion on the same version of DEB’s Revolution rhythm as Barrington Levy’s Black Rose.

No record is more vividly charged with dancehall. Frankie Paul at his peak, vibesing to the max on an awesome rhythm, setting off dogs, bottling the genie: early-eighties Maxfield Avenue gone universal and all-time.

Heartfelt, blessed early-eighties Maxfield Avenue roots, in short supply from the off. Pressed from the original stamper, Digikiller-style: a few clicks at the start can’t test rudie.

Superb one-away roots production by Lloyd Barnes for the singer’s own imprint. No-prisoners organ; singing from the school of Pablo Moses.

Nice, chunky lovers — self-produced around 1980.

Heavy lovers, a Kush Dan I production.

Classic! Evergreen Channel 1 rhythms dubbed to perfection. Re-cut straight from the original master tapes, in hand-silkscreened two-colour jackets, just like the JA original.

Top-notch 1976 dub LP from Channel One, extracted by Digikilller from the original tapes, and nattily sleeved. The set later voiced by the great I-Roy as Musical Shark Attack. Classic stuff.

Classic! Evergreen Channel 1 rhythms dubbed to perfection. Re-cut straight from the original master tapes, in hand-silkscreened two-colour jackets, just like the JA original.

Revisiting the Rythem Track label, started by Callo Collins in 1985.
This one’s a deadly twist on Tempo, from that year.

Green Bay excursion.