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Top-notch dubwise roots, with masterful trombone and extra percussion, originally on Ethnic Fight.

Our nomination for the heaviest dub of all time… When the Rootical Dubber had a go at reissuing this group of records, many years ago, we remember him saying this one was just too awesome to contemplate.

Excellent, early-eighties, previously-unreleased Channel One chiller-killer. Signature, laconic,  hypnotic dub.

Recording as Jah Carlos in 1976. Massive, glorious Soul Syndicate rhythm, with blazing horns, soulful reasoning, tremendous dub. Another great record.

Giddily deep re-cut of Brimstone And Fire, from the Reckless Roots Rockers compilation.

Almighty roots masterpiece. The combination of Perry’s militant genius and the Shoes’ Abyssinians-style wordless singing at the start is intensely stirring, every time. Plus the awesome Tight Spot.

Previously on dubplate only, this legendary UK soundsystem weapon was produced by Sly And Robbie at Maxfield Avenue in the early eighties, with (perhaps) the Mighty Travellers at the microphone. Pure murder.

Legendary roots from 1977. Barrington Levy’s cousin, produced by Lloyd Charmers for his own LTD imprint.

Sweet, hymnal, one-away two-parter from Elijah, out in the seventies on the New York label Waricka and in the UK on Ackee. KC White has a version, too; also available from Digikiller.

Tuff, burning-horns, instrumental militancy with a dose of the Channel Ones, and a very nice, woozy dub.

A key Enforcer — with two different dubs, and an impassioned, previously-unreleased Little Roy piece.

First time out for both sides, including dubs.

Further excursions on Black Oney’s Jah Jah Send The Parson rhythm. Far I rides a stripped dub (originally for a Carib Gems LP); the straighter Oney return was first released in a tiny run of blanks. All three 1975.

Deadly, swaggering horns instrumental, dripping with jazz and funk bad manners, produced by Mikey Jarrett and Lloydie Prince in the early ‘80s. Originally on Man Dingo, out of New York; thrashed by Shaka.

Top, politically trenchant, close-harmony roots from the start of the eighties, originally on Alphonso Bailey’s Free Slaves imprint.

Mellow sufferers’ out originally in 1979 on the Strugglers and Jah Life labels, in JA and NY.

Most essential of the first three Leggos reissued by Digikiller.

Limber bubblers, with some nice, moody vibes-playing, and chewy reasoning from Carlton Lafters, in a Tenor Saw style and fashion.

Killer Cry Tuff melodica lick of Drum Song.

Deadly, hissing, dubwise treatment of the same Fever whip as Famine Time, with its own unique dub worth the price by itself. Sexist nonsense, mind.

Late-80s digi, with a rhythm inspired by Billie Jean, and vocals cribbing Black Uhuru.

Mid-eighties productions from Conrod Green’s Harmodio label.