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Fourth and last of the classic quintet albums with Shorter, Hancock, Carter and Williams. Mostly written by Herbie and Wayne Shorter — a valediction to hard bop, without the old-school machismo.

‘What a big disgrace, the way you rob up the place… everything you can find, you even rob the blind. Now we know the truth… taking people’s business on your head, might as well you be dead.’

With Byard Lancaster. 360 Sound Stereo original.
Good-looking VG sleeve with some colouration on the back, and a cut-out hole punched bottom left.

Previously unrecorded Hank Williams lyrics set to music and performed for the first time by Bob Dylan, Lucinda Williams, Merle Haggard and co.

Only Miles, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams playing five full-length concerts never before issued; and the sole known film of this ineffable lineup between 1965-8.

Three previously unissued tracks from the Newport Jazz Festival of 1969, kicking off with Miles Runs The Voodoo Down no less, plus the full set from the Isle Of Wight in 1970. A steal.

Miles Ahead, Porgy And Bess, Sketches Of Spain, Quiet Nights. Two discs of alternate and rehearsal takes. Loads of notes, rare photos. His ineffable collaborations with Gil Evans. Essential, obviously; such a steal.

Ebullient Troutman business, great throughout, with exemplary Zapped funk, fine ballads and a couple of irresistible rare grooves. CD from Expansion.

Late-60s, minimal, ambient classic, with Riley’s lovely synth and organ-playing deftly elucidating seven phases scored here for large orchestra with extra percussion and electronics.

His symphony for string orchestra (and drums, sax). Brooding, profoundly evocative, achingly beautiful, with the democratic, cosmic vision of Walt Whitman reborn. An amazing, neglected record, warmly recommended.

The debut album — overflowing with spirited, raw and youthful performances, most of them interpretations.

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