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Arthur Russell and Nicky Siano.
Rare and early, from back in 1984.

Three of the Trini’s greatest: the extended Special Disco Version of Stay The Night; Frankie Knuckles’ Nights (Feel Like Getting Down); the 12-inch version of Are You Ready, disco monster and Studio 54 terror.

Another Arthur Russell disco classic, hot on the heels of Is It All Over My Face. Featuring the vocals of Joyce Bowden; mixed by Larry Levan.

The Donna McGhee flag-bearers back with some classic 1980 disco. Producer Ken Gold (from The Real Thing) deep in Chic territory. Ricky Bailey does full justice to the smart lyrics.

The dastardly Sukebe, back from pornotopia with a model-actress-singer on each arm. Grooving, late-70s disco, with giddy strings and orgasmic syndrums; a PG Mercer and Arlen, early-80s style and fashion.

Tripping, B-boy variations in two-step soul, with a tasty case of the gospel tremors. Vivid, layered, spaced-out — the aural equivalent of 3D glasses — and stuffed with fresh ideas.

Great mid-seventies Chicago soul, the real deal. (The film never materialised.)

Jazzy, percussive philosophising in the school of the Watts Prophets and Last Poets. Produced in 1971 by Billy Guy of The Coasters.

Slamming, synthy, late-80s funk somewhere between house, boogie and soul.
As tightly leather-trousered, moustachioed and keen as Prince and Rick James.

Bleeping, off-its-head disco… This is great.

Merrily lubricious Salsoul floor-filler masterminded by Tommy ‘Bump ‘N’ Hustle’ Stewart.
It don’t take a lot to shake what you got.

Her first album, for Columbia in 1961. Her voice is a total knockout already. Several killers here.

We’ve unearthed a few boxes of this pioneering, magisterial compilation, which turned many of us here onto Mustafa Ozkent, Fikret Kizilok, Erkin Koray, Temiz and co, a decade ago. Still dazzling, fresh, essential.