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Fantastic, fountain-head deejaying loaded with upful verbal brilliance (and signature cocks crowing, shrill yeah-yeah-yeahs) over the best vocal performances of the greatest Studio One rhythms then available.

Drawing on the 1960s, from the Alley Cats through The Skatalites to the Soul Vendors, this top-notch retrospective came soon after the great man’s death in 1998, and it’s a worthy tribute, full of love.

Ska beast from the lake of fire with its garments dipped in blood. Plus From Russia With Love on the flip, for crying out loud. Japanese imports, with gorgeous silk-screened labels. Total destruction.

Two all-time ska masterpieces: back-to-back fire.

Tremendous, previously-unreleased takes of ska instrumentals by the Soul Brothers.
Rolando Al luxuriating in jazz; a Tommy McCook cha cha cha.

A Skatalites charger and a jolt of vintage Ethiopian ska rumpus, courtesy of Dub Store in Tokyo.

Gorgeous Jamaicanization of The Miracles’ Choosey Beggar, just as fluently doowop.

Masterpiece. Top-drawer songwriting — thoughtful, soulful lyrics and ace tunes — and definitive performances.

Up and down stuff, but worth it for Mr. Bassie, Fever and especially the stricken funky blues of New Broom. Oh Lord, Why Lord is a cover of Parliament, believe it or not.

Super-tough, dubwise clavinet-version of Spear’s Swell Headed.
Ace socialist roots from Scully and Mr Soul on the flip, too.

Great ska, rocksteady and reggae — with backing from The Skatalites, the Soul Brothers, Soul Vendors, Sound Dimension, and The Wailers, and Garnett Mimms, Fats Domino, Manfred Mann, the Wicked Pickett in the mix.

Coxsone Dodd’s is still the best compilation of Ken Boothe at Brentford Road.

‘Fighting your brothers every day doesn’t make no sense at all. You walk down the road, you see an innocent man, you rob and stab and shoot him down. When you think it’s peace and safety, it’s sudden destruction.’