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Originally released on the Five Arts Label in 1977, then re-issued on Wackies in 1980, this album provides a register of producer Clive Hunt’s work with a who’s who of JA notables.

Originally issued in 1983 — basically the dub counterpart of Sugar Minott’s Wicked Ago Feel It album, and worth buying for the version of Real Rock alone.

Horace has made just three truly great albums: Skylarking, for Studio One; In The Light, for Hungry Town; and — with the biggest impact at the time, and by far the most contemporary — Dance Hall Style.

Vintage Wackies, and — spun out of Horace’s all-time greatest album — unmissable.

The Bullwackies cut of Horace Andy’s Serious Thing eclipses on all sides the classic Bunny Lee version of five or so years earlier — Horace like an angel over a stepping roots arrangement with horns and effects.

Tribute was originally released on the Top Ranking label in 1981, soon after the Wailer’s death in May. An outstanding cut on Sleepy’s Exclusively album, issued the next year in London by Solid Groove.

Three front-rank reggae singers — with extensive credits for such producers as Coxsone Dodd, Augustus Pablo and Glen Brown — whose work at Wackie’s without question includes their very best. Originally two 10s.

Super-tough, odd, scrubby sufferers with some terrific, knackered piano and quaintly acquiescent lyrics. Giddily cavernous dub. Killer Wackies.

Featuring the flute of arranger Clive Hunt (and Mickey Jarrett’s Black Atlantic anti-Klan toast on the flip), for many aficionados this is the premier version of the foundation Studio One rhythm, without exception.

Woozy, extended Clive Hunt instrumental. Piano-as-steel-drum. Pretty killer.

Out originally mid-70s on the Aires label, in a plain, stencilled sleeve, this is based around three cuts of the dreader than dread Free For All rhythm.

Out originally in 1979, on the Wackies’ imprint Hardwax. (The original cover commemorated the first year of Honest Jon’s new reggae shop Maroons Tunes, Bullwackies’ UK distributor.)

Both sides are tough, edgy, dubby lovers’ rock - Joy Card is confident and winning, Lloyd Barnes busy and thrilling throughout.

Recording as Jah Carlos in 1976. Massive, glorious Soul Syndicate rhythm, with blazing horns, soulful reasoning, tremendous dub. Another great record.

Giddily deep re-cut of Brimstone And Fire, from the Reckless Roots Rockers compilation.

Visions Of John Clarke was a little thrown together for its original release in 1979. Still, its sleeve carried a ringing endorsement from Bullwackies himself — ‘President of the John Clarke Fan Club’.

See the CD entry, where this record is combined with Rootsy Reggae.

See CD entry, where this LP is combined with Visions Of John Clarke.

On its original release in 1981, this deejay album sold out so quickly that Wackies was unable to supply his customary distributors outside New York; and it has been high on Wackies-collectors’ lists ever since.

Dark grey on light grey.

Originally released in 1982 this album recasts Philadelphia-style sweet soul within the shimmering, bass-heavy textures of classic Wackies dub, with spine-chilling results.

Issued originally in 1981, with white or blue Wackies labels, with and without information stamped on. The A differs from the album cut; the dub is right up there with Bullwackies’ - anybody’s - best.

Besides Sugar’s International Herb, this 1980 dub album is engineer Douglas Levy’s finest work. Wackies’ fans have been clamouring for its reissue ever since Rhythm And Sound began re-releasing the catalogue.

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