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The most comprehensive collection of steel guitar pop instrumental music from India: film hits from 1962-1986; and all the masters of the steel guitar sound from the period are represented. Vinyl at last.

Cicadas, dragonflies and other insects boogie down live and direct from Laos, Thailand and Burma.

Ngoni blues, street clamour with radios and soundsystems on the move, the stunning voice of Jalimusa Amanita Diabate, Fulani flutes, Dogon chants and Mande songs.

Featuring vintage sides by Po Sein (one of the giants of early Burmese music and theatre), vocal and harp music from 1929, ‘modern songs with electric guitar’, and unique Burmese pop songs with piano.

Shot between 2007 and 2012, Hisham Mayet’s film is an exhilarating, hallucinatory, harrowing record of music, ritual, life, and landscape along the Niger River, as it winds through Mali and the Republic of Niger.

Traditional Islamic folk music from China, with Arabic, Persian, and Turkish influences: Kazakh, Uyghur, Kirgiz and Mongol Erut musicians on stringed instruments like topchar, komuz, rushtar, rawab, tchang.

Limited, gatefold LP version of the first SF CD release in 2003: droning beat pop, early Orkes Melayu songs, Batak Tapanuli, traditional Minang, and rare folk drama from the Indonesian island, from cassettes.

A cosmic take on Saharoui roots: traditional Moorish instruments like the three-string tinidit lute, ardin harp, clay tbal drum, and tea glasses, together with guitar and Korg synth, and Halima’s exalted singing.

Searing, electrifying blues-rock-Saharan-trance, recorded in Dakhla, West Sahara in 2010, this is great.

‘amplified roots rock, blues, and folk in the local Tuareg styles entering into full-on electric guitar psychedelia… two electric guitars, a drum kit and a chorus of vocalists’ (SF). ‘Buy it!’ (Honest Jon’s).

‘Saharan trance stun guitar… a hypnotic choogle that rivals both the Magic Band’s early 70s marathon workouts and the Velvet Underground’s drone on tracks like Sister Ray.’

Sahrawi music, haunting and hypnotic — from poetry sung over traditional instruments to electrifying grooves drenched in reverb and phase effects. Doueh, tidinit, field recordings from Nouakchott market…

From 1998-2000: street scenes, a wedding, a mosque, spontaneous music, political opinion, interviews (a gay man), radio stuff, a song about Saddam Hussein, the mystery of Kazib, underground city.

Beat rockers, psych pop, ballads and freak-outs from Indonesia’s answer to The Beatles.

An invigorating jumble of country soul and asides from Laos and Thailand, drawn from 70s and 80s LPs, 45s and cassettes, mixing electric guitars and organs with traditional instruments like the khaen and the phin.

‘Dreamy musical segments, fleeting glimpses, odd sounds, temple shrines, decay, death, afternoon rains, and mysterious celebrations… from the Irrawaddy delta to humid nights on the streets of Isan province.’

Volume 3. ‘the melodically ornamental and thundering sound of the Nat Pwe orchestra… impossible yet flawless execution of composition, wild free-form improvisation, ghost spirit-possessed vocal divas’ (SF).

From 1989 field recordings, around the villages of Peliatan and Ubud. Amidst fragments of gamelan and ketchak are sounds of the surrounding forests, odd folk for flute and drum, outdoor village theatre.

‘Rock and roll beat, surf, traditional folk mixed with pop, film tunes, electric guitars, sitar and organ solos, brilliant percussion and arrangements crafted by the grooviest bands of the period.’

Vivid, unflinching film of two annual Haitian Vodou pilgrimages — for Ezili Danto, goddess of love, art and passion, and her old man Ogoun, god of war, iron, healing. Ecstatic, bloody, intensely musical.

Twenty-six nuggets, with gorgeous three-panel CD artwork, and two forty-page booklets with extensive notes, lyrics in English, bios and rare photos, including many from the artists’ own collections.

Dangdut, keroncong, jaipongan, rock, pop, disco, as well as theatre, commercials, DJs, news snippets, and other broadcast bits and pieces.

Pop, pissed-up sages, shout-outs to the missus, comedy skits intercut with Zarma string-playing, Denke-denke mollo from Burkina Faso, Malian kora, the Koran, Bori folk, Tuareg guitar, bits of BBC news…

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