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Sides by the singers Hagguli Shmuel Darzi, Selim Daoud, Yishaq Maroudy and Shlomo Mouallim; and two by an ‘Israelite Choir’.

His only recording, though Head of Music and Professor of Oud at the Baghdad Institute Of Fine Arts for thirty years. East-West tone-poems, mixing formal variation and improv. From Rosslyn Hill Chapel, London, 1976.

Jacking synths and electrified bouzouk, from the last decade, the north-east of Syria: ‘one of a kind Dabke party tunes, regional Atabat-styled crooners, and unbelievable Iraqi party jams.’

Representing fifteen years worth of live recordings. Frenzied Syrian dabke, Iraqi choubi and the mix of Arabic, Kurdish and Turkish styles unique to northeastern Syria.

Hot Syrian dabke — highlights from trail-blazing tours between 2009 and 2011. Clear, dynamic recordings; tearing performances, as anyone who went along will testify. Tufnell Park was a sozzled blinder.

Once you’re done with the Raymond Williams, this is an enthralling, rich, open account of the amazing life of Um Kalthoum, following trails deep inside the music and culture of Egyptian society.

‘A masterpiece of Turkish ethno-psychedelic delight… heavy hashish sound — fuzz guitar, impassioned vocals and Eastern percussion…’ Vinyl from Guerssen.

A third helping — rockers like the Rebels, but more winningly the Googoosh girls, sweet-tough, tough-sweet. Gypsy fiddles and shimmering disco strings, crime-jazz piano and Abba knock-offs…

A New York Times tip: ‘I have heard no more beautiful record this year… a righteous calm takes over the album like a spirit force.’

The joys and sorrows, and virtuoso musicianship, of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim immigrants from the dissolving Ottoman Empire, recorded in NYC — plus a disc of masterpieces from their homeland. Warmly recommended.

The Iranian percussion group with guests Ballake Sissoko, Omar Sosa, Renaud Garcia-Fons, Ross Daly, Sylvain Luc and Titi Robin.

Three Palestinian brothers, master oudists — intensely emotional and dramatic, thunder shot through with lightning — joined by percussion and now and again the Tunisian singer Dhafer Youssef.

Utterly beautiful contemporary recordings.

Ceremonial music from villages in south-west Turkey, featuring a range of saz lutes, violin, and sipsi (a small oboe).

A liturgy and feast headquartered in the mountains of Antalya, with semah sacred dancing and sung poetry accompanied on the saz lute. Six instrumentalists, two vocal lineups here: from 2004 and 2011.

Choice sixties and seventies psych, funk and rock, swiped from Turkish 45s.

Chris King from Dust To Digital giving a heap of Turkish 78s the pile-em-high, sell-em-cheap reissue treatment. Naff artwork and crap notes, but some marvellous music to wheedle out, no doubt.

The blind Armenian is one of the very greatest masters of the 12-stringed, fretless lute. Previously unissued, these recordings were made during his tour to the United States in 1950.

Knockout stuff. Superb restorations of original 78s — many original compositions, rare recordings of his violin-playing, ud solos; also his most famous improvisations, recorded when he was only nineteen.