Honest Jons logo

Artists like Faiyaz Khan, Hirabai Barodekar, Dattreya Vishnu Paluskar, and Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, expertly presented by Ian Nagoski.

Great New York latin soul LP from 1969, with Ricardo Marrero and Bobby Marin — check Barbara With The Kooky Eyes — plus unissued tracks by a supergroup including Tito Puente and Louie Ramirez.

Starkly haunting, tearing masterpieces of rebetika from 1933-37, when Rita and Roza ruled the roost. The best Greek composers and musicians around, too.

Ten austere, spiritual ragas by the Hindustani master-singer. Lamonte Young: ‘‘Jamuna ke tir’ in Raga Bhairavi stands as one of the great masterpieces of music.’

The Parisian musette style — from the accordion-banjo-drum trios typically heard in dance halls in the Roaring Twenties, to the refined swing of the 1940s.

Same proudly autobiographical, beat-tape plunderphonics as Meh Mogya, this time with the sampling focussed more on palm-wine and other acoustic Ghanaian music. ‘More Mogya’, ‘More Blood’.

1968 field recordings: one disc the Tajiks and Uzbeks in the north, derived musically from the Central Asian steppe; the other going south for more Pakistani and Indian stylings. Forty pages of notes and photos.

Rocking the party and ramming the dancefloor is the first priority of this review of Latin styles in classic West African dance music, as it emerged with 1950s anti-colonialism, and ran on gloriously into the 70s.

Fabulous, deep Ghanaian high-life from 1979. Profoundly rueful but politically resolute, in their trademark, hypnotic, minor-key manner, with sustained organ and CK Mann-style guitar.

Home of one of the great African bands, Bembeya Jazz, adopted home of Stokely Carmichael and Miriam Makeba, Guinea ‘was the musical beacon of Africa’, as this splendid comp shows. Addictive.

Third in the African Pearls series charts the two decades following Malian independence. Besides the rail bands and orchestras, refreshingly strong on ‘folklore’.

What a start to this series! Wonderful Congolese rumba from Kinshasa and Brazzaville — the dazzling, voluptuous soundtrack to convulsive, bloody anti-colonial struggle — by Franco, Nico, Tabu Ley and full crew.