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Theme De Yoyo, the funk jazz classic. The DVD is Moshe Mizrahi’s 1970 swinging, fist-waving New Wave flic; and an hour-long interview with Joseph Jarman. The last thousand records, nicely sleeved.

Artemiev’s 1989-90 Moscow re-recordings of his soundtracks to the classic Tarkovsky films.

Their playful, mysterious, charming, but long-forgotten soundtrack to an early-60s Italian cult movie. The great Helen Merrill is outstanding.

Heavy, rare, Brazilian-psych soundtrack from 1971 with lashings of fuzz, English and Portuguese vocals by both male and female singers, and all original compositions.

‘We dig. Around the clock.’
‘Hold onto yourself, Bartlett. You’re twenty feet short of the woods. The hole is right here in the open. The guard is between us and the lights.’

Blaxploitation soundtrack from the team behind Fritz The Cat, with Betty Everett, Walter Hawkins and Sonny Stitt, and some tough organ funk led by Merl Saunders.

Hysterical horror-film themes, with India’s finest composers — Bappi Lahiri, R.D Burman, Sonik Omi, Sapan Jogmohan, Laxmikant Pyarelal — revelling in the remit.

Compiled by Jonny Trunk and Joel Martin from Quiet Village. From some fine jazz and dug-out Burman, to bananas versions of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and These Boots Are Made For Walking.

The most comprehensive collection of steel guitar pop instrumental music from India: film hits from 1962-1986; and all the masters of the steel guitar sound from the period are represented. Vinyl at last.

The original Silva Screen album (with twenty minutes of newly released music) plus a second twenty-track disc of the entire score, from original tapes, remastered by long-time JC collaborator Alan Howarth.

Two Jean Rollin, French Horrotica soundtracks: Philippe D’Aram’s vintage synth experimentalism and free-rock, for Fascination; dynamic drums-and-keys-based chamber music by Pierre Raph, for Requiem.

His piercingly atmospheric soundtrack to this film featuring the one and only Jeanne Moreau. A neglected Miles, with some of his most affective playing. Highly recommended.

His piercingly atmospheric soundtrack to this film released as Frantic in the US, better known here as Lift To The Scaffold. A neglected Miles, with some of his very best playing. Highly recommended.

Albums of the original score — as played by Italian prog-rockers Goblin — have always been in print. Here at last are the dark and twisted incidental cues — like all the music from the shopping mall scenes.

The soundtrack to the Martin Scorsese film — including twenty-six previously unreleased recordings.

Jazzy, trippy soundtrack of the 1968 American surf movie.

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