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Another Numero imprint! NYC folk from 1962, notable for the first outing of Miller’s own composition, Baby Don’t Go To Town — before it was stolen from her and converted into Hey Joe. Numerophon will be vinyl-only.

As Bob Dylan writes — ‘out of Carolina, he hammered away at some harp-like instrument and sang in a bone chilling soprano voice. Niles was eerie and illogical, terrifically intense and gave you goosebumps’.

‘Niles was otherworldly and his voice raged with strange incantations’ (Bob Dylan). 1950s recordings from an Appalachian living-room, exquisitely presented and hotly recommended. Fab.

The definitive recordings, using Noncarrow’s original instruments — two Ampico player pianos, one with metal-covered felt hammers and the other with leather strips on the hammers.

Fabulous home recordings and demos, mostly from NY 1965-66. Though rooted in the city’s folk scene, and showing a big debt to Fred Neil especially, these cuts give a full indication of what was to come.

‘Oh, Lordy, women and grown men drown / Oh, women and children sinkin’ down, Lord, have mercy / I couldn’t see nobody’s home and wasn’t no one to be found.’

A stunning collection of misery, murder, death and all kinds of horrible goings on, introduced by Tom Waits.

One-of-a-kind, legendary, psych-folk masterpiece, originally out on Kapp in 1970.

His 1966 debut for Vanguard, evocatively fusing psych-folk and raga way ahead of its time, and also featuring flautist Jeremy Steig and long-time Dylan cohort Bruce Langhorn.

His lost farewell to the sixties. Pure Walker from the guitarist taught by Ravi Shankar and Ali Akbar Khan, championed by Jack Rose and co. Beautifully presented with long notes by PW himself.

Spun by Numero out of their Ladies Of The Canyon compilation, and by Caroline herself out of Joni Mitchell back in 1972.