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The 1970 album debut of the twenty-year old Kentuckian: ‘a singularly enchanted album of unhurried, low key loner ballads’. If you like Townes Van Zandt, check it out. Everything well done as usual by Locust.

Mesmerizing third LP, from 1968… more experimental, reaching. With Buzzin’ Fly, a laid-back killer; the epic, frantic Gypsy Woman; the heart-breaking Dream Letter, to baby son Jeff.

At his furthest out, in 1969.

The live footage is thrilling, charged — especially the Starsailor stuff.

From 1967, his best commercial success in his lifetime — a potent mix of baroque pop and yearning, questing folk. And boy, could he sing! Several all-time highlights here.

‘At his most righteously drugged… two songs spread over a looped path of colored time. Bull as guru. Bull as shaman… takes his past triumphs and brings them higher, to an acid-singed multi-colored height.’

Specials by the rockabilly legend, recorded for Goldwax in 1961: the opener is reissued from the tapes for the first time; the closer is previously unreleased; the other two are alternate versions.

Classic banjo-fiddle-guitar-vocals combos, plus instrumentals featuring twin-fiddle and piano. All the Highlanders gear with Roy Harvey, Lucy Terry, and twin-fiddlers Lonnie Austin and Odell Smith.

‘Whether it’s folk songs, double-entendre blues, old-time breakdowns, or Tin Pan Alley, this album is all about roosters, hens, chicks, pullets, and the occasional turkey or duck thrown in for good measure!’

From the Tree Person’s solo album Real Life And Fiction: a punky-folk drone with chimes; disconsolate cheer-leading on the flip.

The wonderful Takoma LP originally released in 1966: solo acoustic guitar instrumentals from folk and blues legends like Bukka White, John Fahey and Robbie Basho, alongside finds like Max Ochs and Harry Taussig.