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The first, 1994 album. Thirty-two lo-fi folk-guitar instros: Appalachian polyrhythms, dark melodies, flamenco thrash, alien tunings, pseudo eastern drones, cinematic backroad twang, other hybrids not easily described.

Two years since the Portland guitarist’s last for Mississippi, and worth the wait — solo instrumentals from the heart, driving her bluesy sensibility a few times round the Appalachians, this time.

Superb fourth album, bare but sparkling, steeped in her vaudevillian take on Americana, rawly confessional and beautifully voiced as ever —  a mid-thirties heartful of fierce discontent.

Well worth checking the ‘psychedelic appalachia’ of this twenty-two-year-old guitarist from Fredericksberg (like the late Jack Rose).

His fourth album, already. Banjo and guitar, including a first full outing on lap guitar. Mostly solo, but fiddler Sally Morgan from the Black Twig Pickers is here, and Charlie Devine pops up on banjo.

‘A beautiful gem featuring eight freewheeling unaccompanied six and twelve string guitar pieces.’

Back in business, with his best outing for a while, this is class.
Fine songwriting, steeped in its own version of Americana (Don Williams, late Elvis), and richly produced.

Will and the lads (Ben Boye, Van Campbell, Emmett Kelly, Danny Kiely, Angel Olson) bang through a few new takes on some BPB classics.

Limited vinyl of a self-released CDR from 2005, in handmade sleeves. Americana instrumentals and songs (including Woody Guthrie’s Deportees), solo and in small group settings, with dobro and steel.

Following Alan Lomax, Daptone placed a small local ad, asking singers to show at Mt Marian Church a certain Saturday. This marvellous record of acappella gospel is the result, including everyone who showed up.

Politically indignant, sorely poignant, musically prodigal — Tex Mex through cartoon-Chinese reggae through Brecht ‘n Weil — elegy for local LA neighbourhoods like Chavez Ravine, swept away by 1950s capital.