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Fab tee, in honour of Harry Smith.

The first, 1994 album. Thirty-two lo-fi folk-guitar instros: Appalachian polyrhythms, dark melodies, flamenco thrash, alien tunings, pseudo eastern drones, cinematic backroad twang, other hybrids not easily described.

Two years since the Portland guitarist’s last for Mississippi, and worth the wait — solo instrumentals from the heart, driving her bluesy sensibility a few times round the Appalachians, this time.

Superb fourth album, bare but sparkling, steeped in her vaudevillian take on Americana, rawly confessional and beautifully voiced as ever —  a mid-thirties heartful of fierce discontent.

24 prime cuts from the fabulous Art Rosenbaum box set.

‘... a favourite item of anyone with an interest in genuine American traditional music’, wrote Shirley Collins about Volume I. Again a must, in a 10-inch box, with a 96-page book of essays, lyrics, photos and art.

Well worth checking the ‘psychedelic appalachia’ of this twenty-two-year-old guitarist from Fredericksberg (like the late Jack Rose).

His fourth album, already. Banjo and guitar, including a first full outing on lap guitar. Mostly solo, but fiddler Sally Morgan from the Black Twig Pickers is here, and Charlie Devine pops up on banjo.

The king of mush mouth country blues.

A factory-sealed cut-out, with a notch in the case.

A 1969 Blue Thumb, post-Takoma. ‘Arabic, Himalayan and Indian themes, Japanese and Chinese scales, classical and European folk music… on magnificent display on this sprawling, spiritually-charged album.’

His gone, meditative 1965 debut, already steeped in Eastern modalities and Indian mysticism. The opener is based on a Ravi Shankar raga; Bardo Blues is a musical rendition of the Tibetan Book Of The Dead.

Tremendous 1978 LP. 6 and 12 string guitars, piano; singing and whistling, to keep it real. ‘‘Better to drink wine from the hands than water from a pretty cup’… the ultimate is wine from a pretty cup. Amen.’