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Totally unmissable just for the opener, a killer, 15-minute version of Arlen’s show-tune Out Of This World — drums and bass locking it down, Trane taking flight. From 1962, between Ole and Impressions.

Hard-blowing bop classic from 1958, when Trane was with Monk. A crack sextet rounded out by the richly soulful trombone of youngster Curtis Fuller. Next up, Giant Steps.

Sublime session from LA in 1960 with new man McCoy Tyner on piano. Paired with the odd but enjoyable album from 1958 with tuba-player Ray Draper’s quartet.

A revelation when released in 2006: new-found tapes from two nights at the Half Note in the quartet’s last year, 1965. Awesome Coltrane.

The last Atlantic is a masterpiece, modal heaven. Ole is thunderous (two bass players), Aisha a gorgeous ballad. ‘George Lane’ is Eric Dolphy; Freddie Hubbard’s here, too.

Trane’s majestic debut for Atlantic. The CD-only alternates are intriguing and not a bore (from several dates in 1959 with various pianists and drummers).

With the classic, studio version of the title track. The drummer John Stevens (much-missed) used to rave about Steve Davis, seldom recorded but here on bass.

Heavy vinyl, cut from the original analogue master, in a quality sleeve. These RTI issues from Rhino are way superior to your usual 180g kidology. Like Sonny is here, Fifth House…

From 1957 and 58 sessions, dusted down in 1961. The trio settings give him room to shine… but this is a must for the fourteen-minute title-track, with Byrd, Red Garland, Louis Hayes, Paul Chambers. Just stunning.

With the Red Garland Trio.

Freely, incandescently on song with Alice on piano, Pharoah, Jimmy Garrison, Rashied Ali, and percussionist Emanuel Rahim, in 1967. A gorgeous Naima, a six-minute bass solo, a frenzied My Favourite Things.

With Pharoah and Alice, Jimmy Garrison and Rashied Ali. Late, scorching, previously unissued recordings — torrential expressivity worn to holy fire — a bit shoddily presented.

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