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Out of Phoenix, Arizona, Lenaburg’s 60s and 70s productions typify the wrong-side-of-the-desert sound (if ever there was). A melange of Tejano psych, flutey funk, horny soul, and fistfight doo-wop.

For twenty years in Detroit, this label failed at everything except what counts: soulful doo-wop, blistering garage funk, sultry R and B, cut-rate Hendrix over a steel drum break.

Four years of singles on the Lloyd and Deep City labels run by Willie Clark and Johnny Pearsall: sixties Miami’s rarest of the rare, including the vinyl debuts of Betty Wright and Paul Kelly.

The history of the Chicago label, and the life of its owner Arrow Brown: twenty tracks of blistering R and B, sweet soul, and discofied funk. Now on vinyl, in a sumptuous Numero box-set.

Short for ‘Capital City Soul’, this Columbus, Ohio label ran for five years during the 1970s. Founded by Bill Moss, a local singer and DJ, Capsoul released just a dozen 45s and one LP.

Even after various surveys over the years, a fresh, unmissable selection from this great Chicago soul label, with unreleased tracks. With 13 extras, the vinyl is beautifully packaged.

Fifty recordings on Jesse Jones’ twin labels out of Atlanta, between 1968-1977. Southern to northern soul, classic R and B to modern, dancers to romancers.

Drawing on Dick Smart’s group of soul labels run out of Wichita, Kansas, from 1963-75 — like Solo, Kanwic, Vantage and Lee-Mac.

Some gorgeous, classic, unmistakably Chicagoan soul here — the productions of Richard Pegue.

Quality sweet soul, ballads, thumping dancers, girl-group and the rest from Abe Epstein’s San Antonio label, late-1960s. Curtis and co in the air. Fine singing, big drums, strong horns, sophisticated arranging.

Reviewing Ellis Taylor’s Kansas City imprint — from prime Marva Whitney all the way through to Sharon Revoal’s ace, slinky, early-eighties disco-funk.